Pop Quiz

Pop Quiz: This Is Your Brain on Cell Phones

I don’t know about you, but I use my cell phone a lot. Like, a lot. Texting, Facebook, Twitter, Angry Birds, and sometimes even for phone calls. My trusty iPhone is a part of everything I do.

Recently, the World Health Organization has said that cell phones “possibly” cause an increase in malignant brain tumors.

But a group of 31 experts from 14 countries conducted a review of the scientific literature and determined that the evidence, though limited, could support a connection between cellphone use and brain tumors — cancerous gliomas and acoustic neuromas, which are noncancerous.

As Stacey pointed out on Skepchick, this may not be such a big deal. The WHO just said that tumors could be increased by cell phone use, but more study is still needed.

Will this recent finding by the World Health Organization change the way you use your cell phone? Will you use it less often, or wear an earpiece? Or are you like me, and use your cell phone for mostly non-speaking activities? Tell us what you think!

Featured image credit: daita

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Mindy

Mindy

Mindy is an attorney and Managing Editor of Teen Skepchick. She hates the law and loves stars. You can follow her on Twitter and on Google+.

2 Comments

  1. June 3, 2011 at 5:18 am —

    This won’t change my usage. The science WHO review was already known to me and I think their decision was overly cautious. The balance of good research points at low power microwave radiation (as from cell phones and Wi-Fi) is harmless, and the few studies that made the WHO trigger tabloid cancer alerts all over the globe are at the weak end of the spectrum with obvious options to explain their results other than a tiny effect of cell phone usage on cancer rates, such as people with brain cancer being more likely to report high levels of cell phone usage when they’re asked to recall such usage for the previous _decade_.

  2. June 8, 2011 at 6:56 am —

    No. If you listen to my podcast (podcast.bogosity.tv) in the latest episode I rip the WHO a new one for shoddy science. In their so-called “meta-study,” they pretty much ignored everything else except for one data point in one study, and used THAT to make their recommendation–when even that study’s authors said the effect can’t be established because of “biases and errors.” The WHO did shoddy science.

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