• Joshua Smith posted a new activity comment 3 years ago

    Wow. My claim is that I observed empirically significant evidence (p < .01) that there was a difference between organic products used vs. non-organic. Of only anecdotal note do I subjectively state that I also feel better. I openly recognize my single experience may not be representative and may be flawed due to personal contamination, hence my…[Read more]

  • Joshua Smith posted a new activity comment 3 years ago

    Absolutely, my personal discovery does not justify the organic movement and although I used scientific devices and procedures as part of my experience, it’s clearly not without possible error, bias, etc. Hence I’m collaborating with a colleague to conduct some formalized research.

    But, given that the challenge *is* backed by a 60-day…[Read more]

    • Nope. Not at all interested. I don’t take challenges where my own flawed perceptions can derail the outcomes. Doctors are not allowed to use placebo, save in dire cases, like wars, where there is literally no option but either give someone hope, or see them die, because the same mental manipulation that can make someone better can make them worse.…[Read more]

      • Wow. My claim is that I observed empirically significant evidence (p < .01) that there was a difference between organic products used vs. non-organic. Of only anecdotal note do I subjectively state that I also feel better. I openly recognize my single experience may not be representative and may be flawed due to personal contamination, hence my…[Read more]

      • Just saying.. Beware your personal research isn’t just biased, but dead wrong. Me.. I will go with the recommendations made by health experts, when I can actually get at that information. So, so, soooo much of what is out there is **not** from actual nutritionists. Even the food pyramid, and its replacement, are **both** political, as much as…[Read more]

    • Please elaborate on what differences were measured, how they were measured, and what statistical process was used to arrive at a p <0.01 significance level.

    • My claim is that I observed empirically significant evidence (p < .01)

      Second person asking: how was this measured?

    • 3rd person asking… How do you derive statistically significant data from a study of 1 person?

      • but-but-but! he observed some anecdotal evidence! no confirmation bias here, no sir.

      • “I coupled the 10 days with precise scientific measurements of my body for months before and after the 10 days and less scientifically my own perceptions.”

        And measuring what, exactly? And with what instruments?

      • 4th person asking: Wouldn’t p for an n=1 study be around .5? In other words, a crapshoot?

      • 5th person asking, and please also verify whether the “10-day Celebrity Transformation” you speak of is the multi level marketing scheme produced by Purium Health that is marketed as a cleanse and really has nothing to do with organics?

        Skepticism is a pain in the ass when you’re trying to sell stuff isn’t it?

      • “Formalized research” — that’s what Joshua Smith called his “challenge”. LOL

      • Do we have a meme now? 😉

  • Joshua Smith posted a new activity comment 3 years ago

    Aloha. Not sure how I stumbled across this article, but was intrigued by your commentary. I read two of your linked articles “Why This Mom Boycotts Organic and Will Never Shop at Whole Foods” and “Choosy Moms Choose GMOs” and appreciate your candor, though naturally I don’t agree with everything stated. But hey, that’s the nature of journalism.…[Read more]

    • Thing is.. Organic, because it doesn’t produce nice clean crops, so to speak, has to be more picky about what is put on the shelf. Its plausible that just simply picking out the fruit, vegetables, etc. that are less bruised, because its easier to see which ones are in organic crops **may** mean that certain negative characteristics that do effect…[Read more]

      • Absolutely, my personal discovery does not justify the organic movement and although I used scientific devices and procedures as part of my experience, it’s clearly not without possible error, bias, etc. Hence I’m collaborating with a colleague to conduct some formalized research.

        But, given that the challenge *is* backed by a 60-day…[Read more]

        • Nope. Not at all interested. I don’t take challenges where my own flawed perceptions can derail the outcomes. Doctors are not allowed to use placebo, save in dire cases, like wars, where there is literally no option but either give someone hope, or see them die, because the same mental manipulation that can make someone better can make them worse.…[Read more]

          • Wow. My claim is that I observed empirically significant evidence (p < .01) that there was a difference between organic products used vs. non-organic. Of only anecdotal note do I subjectively state that I also feel better. I openly recognize my single experience may not be representative and may be flawed due to personal contamination, hence my…[Read more]

          • Just saying.. Beware your personal research isn’t just biased, but dead wrong. Me.. I will go with the recommendations made by health experts, when I can actually get at that information. So, so, soooo much of what is out there is **not** from actual nutritionists. Even the food pyramid, and its replacement, are **both** political, as much as…[Read more]

        • Please elaborate on what differences were measured, how they were measured, and what statistical process was used to arrive at a p <0.01 significance level.

        • My claim is that I observed empirically significant evidence (p < .01)

          Second person asking: how was this measured?

        • 3rd person asking… How do you derive statistically significant data from a study of 1 person?

          • but-but-but! he observed some anecdotal evidence! no confirmation bias here, no sir.

          • “I coupled the 10 days with precise scientific measurements of my body for months before and after the 10 days and less scientifically my own perceptions.”

            And measuring what, exactly? And with what instruments?

          • 4th person asking: Wouldn’t p for an n=1 study be around .5? In other words, a crapshoot?

          • 5th person asking, and please also verify whether the “10-day Celebrity Transformation” you speak of is the multi level marketing scheme produced by Purium Health that is marketed as a cleanse and really has nothing to do with organics?

            Skepticism is a pain in the ass when you’re trying to sell stuff isn’t it?

          • “Formalized research” — that’s what Joshua Smith called his “challenge”. LOL

          • Do we have a meme now? 😉

      • There’s also the opposite, the ‘nocebo’ effect, which has actually been responsible for the deaths of otherwise healthy people:

        http://io9.com/how-the-nocebo-effect-can-trick-us-into-actually-dyin-1681746203

        How our perceptions influence our biology is fascinating and strange as fiction.